Definitions

Typical components and/or capabilities of intrusion/burglar alarm security systems include but are not limited to:

1. Control Panels – Controllers installed at the same site as the other security components in a secure area such as a telecommunications closet or other inaccessible area which facilitate the communications of alarm events to the monitoring station via a virtual private network.

2. Keypads – Devices through which the area or specific components can be armed or disarmed as needed.

3. Motion detectors – Devices which detect motion within an area where no motion should be occurring due to the armed state of the area.

4. Glass break detectors – Devices which detect breakage of glass such as that which would occur if a window were broken to gain unauthorized access to an area.

5. Sirens/Sounders – Devices which emit loud audible sounds for the purpose of alerting personnel that a security breach has occurred.

6. Panic Buttons – Devices, ordinarily within reach but hidden from public view, which send silent alarms to the monitoring station for the purpose of alerting FSUPD or others that security assistance is required.

 

Common terms pertaining to card access security systems:

1. Armed State – A programmed state of a security component which allows the generation of an alarm in the event of a security breach. Armed state times are subject to the University Standard Card Access Arming and Disarming Policy as stated here.

2. Disarmed State – A programmed state of a security component which ignores events that may or may not be related to a security breach. While in a disarmed state, no alarms are presented to alarm monitoring stations. Disarmed state times are subject to the University Standard Card Access Arming and Disarming Policy as stated here.

3. Alarm Shunt – a pre-defined programmable period of time when alarms are NOT sent to the monitoring station due to a legitimate, authorized entry into or exit from an area which is in an armed state. Shunt times are subject to the University Standard Shunt Time Policy as stated here.

 4. Door Forced Open Condition – A condition which, when a door is armed, generates a security breach alarm to the FSUPD alarm monitoring station. This condition will occur at a monitored door if it is opened without presentation of a valid authorized card, such as through the use of a key or an actual breaking and entering.

5. Door Held Open Condition – A condition which, when a door is armed, generates a security breach alarm to the FSUPD alarm monitoring station. This condition will occur at a monitored door if the door is left open for a period which exceeds the programmed alarm shunt time.

6. Clearance Codes – Software programming which defines where and when a card may be used to access a given area. Clearance Codes are assigned to individuals based on need as defined by the department, and assignment to a cardholder is requested through a Department authorized Security Representative.

7. False Alarms – Alarms which are generated due to misuse of card access systems rather than by actual security breaches of areas.

8. Excessive false alarms – Alarms generated due to misuse of systems which result in an on-site visit by the FSUPD or its representative, and occur in excess of 5 times in any 90-day period of time.